KNAP, M.: Soerabaja, Java (Sep. 2, 1938).

In Soerabaja, Javanese children have better teeth than Dutch; Dutch, better than Chinese (Table 2). Differences in frequency of caries are indicated by the comparative data in the table for these types of children in Soerabaja.

TABLE 2

Comparative data on caries in children in Soerabaja

Cavities or
fillings

  Children
No.                 Percent

Cavities or
fillings

Children

No.                        Percent

 

Europeans

 

Chinese

 
None  

7

3.66 None

2

0.78
1 to 8  

69

36.12 1 to 8

62

24.40
9 to 16  

56

29.31 9 to 16

71

27.95

16 or more

 

59

30.89

16 or more

119

46.86
 

Javanese

 

New Yorkers (Brodsky, 1933)

None  

18

6.37 None

1

0.39
1 to 8  

113

40.07 1 to 8

29

11.39
9 to 16  

73

25.88 9 to 16

124

48.53

16 or more

 

78

27.65

16 or more

102

39.84

 

There is a relation between presence, size, and position of third molars and susceptibility to caries ; also between orthodontic divergences and susceptibility to caries, independently of the fact that orthodontic defects may directly favor onset of caries. The Javanese use various means to blacken teeth,

which in vitro show greater resistance to acid (0.2 percent lactic) than normal teeth.

Javanese children have better teeth because (a) they are breast-fed until they are about one year old; (b) play naked in the sunshine until they are four or five years old ; and (c) chew sugar-cane and eat bananas, other fruits, and raw plants and vegetables. (d) Among the Javanese, infant mortality is very high—” sur­vival of the fittest.” Chinese children have the worst teeth because, as a rule, they are not breast-fed and play in the shade.

References: Tandh. Correspondentieblad Ned. Indie, 1934, 1935, 1936; Leer­boek voor de klinisch conserveerende tandheelkunde, 1934 (Kolff, Soerabaja).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *